Archive for the ‘Sandoval County’ category

Rio Rancho: City of Vision

March 19th, 2010
YouTube Preview Image

 

The City of Rio Rancho is the fastest-growing city in New Mexico. Incorporated in 1981, the city has a 2009 population of more than 80,000 and is the third largest city in the State. The City of Rio Rancho is located in Central New Mexico between Albuquerque and Santa Fe. Rio Rancho is a great place for your base when touring Sandoval County and Central New Mexico!

Visiting Sandoval County

March 19th, 2010
YouTube Preview Image

 

Less than an hour from Albuquerque’s international airport and the allure of Santa Fe beats the heart of New Mexico. Can you hear it? Cool mountain forests. Hot springs. Lush riverbanks. High desert vistas. Can you see it? Spicy chile and exquisite wine. Can you taste it? Sandoval County is a land of contrast steeped in history. From pueblo Indians to Spanish explorers to Mexican traders, these diverse cultures continue to enrich this land and all its visitors. Can you feel it? From bustling Rio Rancho and Bernalillo to the serenity of Jemez Springs and wide-open wilderness, Sandoval County has plenty to offer.

For more information, visit:
Sandoval County Visitor Center
264 Camino del Pueblo
Bernalillo, New Mexico 87004
505-867-TOUR (8687) / 800-252-0191

Jemez Mountain Trail

November 4th, 2009
YouTube Preview Image

The Jemez Mountain Trail twists through time and terrain, contrasting vermilion desert cliffs and snowy alpine peaks, 13 th century stone dwellings and the birth of the Atomic Age in nearly the same breath. Travelers may fish canyon waters at dawn, don snowshoes for a woodland trek, explore ancient Pueblo ruins and view elk crossing an immense volcanic caldera all in the same day.

The trail begins at the junction of U.S. 550 and N.M. 4 in the pastoral village of San Ysidro, named for the patron saint of farmers. Passing a restored church of the same name, N.M. 4 slowly winds past Jemez Pueblo, home to more than 3,000 tribal members who call the village Walatowa in their native language, Towa. Jemez Pueblo sits at the gateway to the spectacular Canon de San Diego, where the road bisects reddish-orange cliffs as it enters the Red Rocks of the Jemez. The Walatowa Visitor Center (877-733-5687) is wedged in these rocks, along with roadside stands selling crafts, fry bread and red and green chile stew. Jointly operated by Jemez Pueblo and the Santa Fe National Forest, the visitor center houses a museum and gift shop and provides information about the area.

Filming Adventures in Sandoval County

October 26th, 2009

We had a great time filming within Sandoval County, particularly on the drive up the Jemez Trail Scenic Byway.  We learned along the way just how important it is to obey the speed limits and make sure you have permission to film! 

Just before entering the Jemez Pueblo, Benny Shendo, Jr., the Pueblo’s 1st Lt. Governor, stopped us as a reminder that we were about to enter the Pueblo and that no filming was permitted without permission from the Pueblo Governor.  Before we knew it we were in the presence of the Governor David Toledo, 1st Lt. Governor, Benny Shendo, Jr., and 2nd Lt. Governor, Stanley Toldeo, to talk about our filming and travel adventure and to learn about the Jemez Pueblo and the great people who live there.  Governor Toledo explained why photography is limited within the Pueblo and graciously gave us permission to film as a way of showing all of you what a great place Jemez Pueblo is to visit.  Lots of art and pottery and the Visitors Center is a must!

As we entered Jemez Springs we had another surprise.  Ace Producer, Frank Melo, who was behind the wheel, was pulled over for doing 36 miles an hour.  Now we who work on Travel Guide NEW MEXICO know that Frank is the last guy to ever get caught for speeding.  If anything he would be the guy to get stopped for going under the speed limit!  And we should have known that to truly appreciate all there is to see in and around Jemez Springs you do need to maintain the 25 mile an hour speed limit! 

los-alamos-thumbnailOn to Los Alamos, New Mexico, and after a long 14 hour day of filming the Jemez Trail Scenic Byway we decided that one last shot was in order.  That shot happened to be the sign announcing “Los Alamos National Laboratory.”   So, we sent junior producer/photographer, Dan Schueler out with the camera to get just the sign.  Lo and behold, it wasn’t two minutes before two very heavily armed security officers had Dan in a tizzy…literally.  Poor Dan didn’t know what to do.  They were threatening to haul him away, confiscate the camera and take Frank and me along for the ride as well!   So, after a short time of discussing our situation we were permitted to “move along” but not until we erased all images of the Lab’s sign!   Then we were told that we could contact the Lab’s public relations office to get “approved” photos of the sign and other Los Alamos photos. 

All in a day’s work for Dan and the rest of us at Travel Guide NEW MEXICO!  Honestly, though, it was great having a chance to meet the leaders of the Jemez Pueblo and learn about their history and culture; a  Sandoval County Sheriff’s Deputy (who give us some great ideas of places to stop and film); and to fully understand the security of Los Alamos National Laboratory and why security is so important there. 

Perhaps down the road we’ll do an entire show on “Photographing New Mexico – The Do’s and Don’t’s!”    Just another TGNM adventure!

Sandoval County

August 8th, 2009

Sandoval County was established in March of 1903. The county seat is Bernalillo. The county was named for the Sandoval family who were early settlers. This county has many attractions like the Bandelier National Monument, Coronado State Monument, many ancient Indian ruins, and excellent hunting and fishing. Less than an hour from Albuquerque’s international airport and the allure of Santa Fe beats the heart of New Mexico.

Can you hear it? Cool mountain forests. Hot springs. Lush riverbanks. High desert vistas. Can you see it? Spicy chile and exquisite wine. Can you taste it? Sandoval County is a land of contrast steeped in history. From pueblo Indians to Spanish explorers to Mexican traders, these diverse cultures continue to enrich this land and all its visitors. Can you feel it? From bustling Rio Rancho and Bernalillo to the serenity of Jemez Springs and Corrales and wide-open wilderness, Sandoval County has plenty to offer.

Visit the Sandoval County website here.

Switch to our mobile site